I <3 Polymer 1.0

One of my more recent pet projects has been to create a web-based application using Polymer 1.0, a web framework Google released at their I/O conference this past Spring.

In short, I don’t think I can ever go back to developing on the web without it. Not only do I strongly suggest everyone give Polymer 1.0 a try, but I implore new developers to learn web development by implementing it, and current dev teams to incorporate it into their product lifecycle – at the very least during their rapid prototyping stages.

Why is that? Good question!

For one, it is the first time I’ve ever used a web framework where the resulting code base feels legitimate, complete, and inherently organized; not a mesh of scripts and views that the original developer will need to walk other devs through to ramp them up.

For new devs, the clean, class based, object-oriented structure will help mature their web development habits. Even as an engineer with over 15+ years of development experience, I felt like using the framework improved my habits.

For product teams, the scoped modularity of the elements allow their group to quickly re-work layouts and functionality – on an element-by-element basis. You can inherit core elements and layouts, and test them individually as you assemble the project. Designers can perfect a single element’s look and feel even before the structure of the application is built. It makes for an excellent segway between mockup and final product.

What makes Polymer so Different?

1: It uses web components, shadow dom, and pure HTML/CSS to render templates.

2: Each element you create is packaged individually and contains: a tag based HTML layer, a scoped CSS layer, a JS layer and an import framework.

The web  world is made up of hacks

The truth is most (if not all) HTML/JS frameworks are made up of what could be described as a series of “hacks” that attempt to create a consistent end-product across all web browsers (and versions of browsers) out there.  These hacks are necessary due to the slow pace to which web standards evolve, and exacerbated by the fragmentation created by the popularity, and propriety, of those browsers.

A Polymer Breakdown

Shims and Polyfills

Shims and polyfills are hacks that transparently help protect a developer from the need to implement legacy or cross browser functionality. As the name describes, they fill in all the compatibility holes browsers leave behind.

Shadow DOM

You actually interact with the Shadow DOM all the time on the web without realizing it. When you use an HTML tag such as <video>  you are requesting an element to be rendered by the browser. That element is composed of many subelements you can’t see in the inspector, ergot “shadow dom”. These subelements, such as the ones composing the video tag for example, manipulate and manage each frame of your video content. By creating your own custom elements utilizing the shadow DOM you are able to encapsulate entire chunks of your application’s functionality into a single tag.

WebComponents.org

Webcomponents.org has created a Polyfill library that allows users to take advantage of custom elements like the ones descrived described above. For example, a profile card you create can be shared and implemented as a single tag: <profile-card></profile-card>, by simply importing the “/profile-card.html” component.

Unlike other frameworks or libraries (such as Angular, Handlebars or JQuery) which work to manipulate and manage separately constructed HTML tags and CSS code, Polymer combines web components, polyfills, shims, CSS, HTML tags, two-way binding and the shadow dom into into a single package.

Scoped CSS

The Polymer/WebComponents structure solves certain small annoyances of web development, like having to keep track of all your CSS styles and hierarchies across your app. Every Polymer element scopes its CSS selectors to the element itself, thus, these selectors will not affect other CSS selectors outside of the custom element you create. In other words, you can use “.my-box” over and over to style different boxes based on their element context without affecting one another.

Some other useful features:

  • Drop-in documentation rendering system
  • Drop in testing frameworks

I could really go on and on about how smooth and organized it feels to develop something using Polymer, but it’s best for you to give it a shot yourself. Let me know what you think or if you have any questions.

Getting Started

Here is a look at a basic custom element setup:

fake-element_html_—_bitlang

If you are unsure of where to begin, start by using Polymer’s sample project (aka Polymer Starter Kit). It is a fully functioning app with a folder structure and gulp file built in. I original strayed away from the starter kit structure, but found myself ending up the same place as they did eventually. They did a good job with it, and it looks like they keep iterating on it.

Note: I should mention that there has been one annoyance I’ve had to deal with while learning Polymer: the lack of documentation and relating forums. The things that ARE available refer to Google’s originally releases Polymer 0.5 from a few years ago.  These posts are often unhelpful since so many nuances are different in 1.0. The good news is my new questions posted on Stackoverflow had responses within a matter of hours.

 

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